More than 300 Schools Find Solutions for Battling Bullies, Bad Behavior, and Below-Average Test Scores

May 15, 2012WASHINGTON, DC—Academic achievement, student behavior, and classroom culture – the ABCs that many schools struggle with – are areas of excellence for more than 300 schools recognized by the Character Education Partnership (CEP). CEP selected 25 National Schools of Character and 297 Promising Practices for 2012.

“You hear so much about school problems these days that it’s great to focus on schools that work,” said CEP President & CEO Mark Hyatt. “These schools went through a very rigorous evaluation process and we are thrilled to recognize their achievements and tell their stories.”

Students from all types of schools are reaping the rewards from quality, comprehensive character education that engages parents, students, staff, and the community as partners. Each schoolhas a story to tell about increased academic achievement, fewer disciplinary problems, and other benefits of a caring school climate. See the full list of National Schools of Character.

For example, Hamilton City School District, an urban district in Hamilton, OH, with a poverty rate of 70% has seen its graduation rate increase from 77.5% to 92.2% over the past four years.

Another inspiring National School of Character is Eagle Rock School in rural Estes Park, CO, designed to meet the needs of “at-risk” high school students. Aremarkable 80% of the students graduate. One staff member said, “Our graduates speak about the transformative nature of their years at ERS. They are in the workforce, in undergraduate, masters, and PhD programs. They were headed toward drop out status.”

Students say bullying israre at another National School of Character. “We don‘t have bullying issues,” said James, a fifth-grader at Mockingbird Elementary School in Coppell,TX.

For the past five years, more than 95% of students scored at least “proficient” on tests in language arts and math at Mockingbird Elementary. A Mockingbird staff member said, “Our staff and families recognize that academic achievement has no meaning unless our learners have integrity, a good work ethic, care for others, and are able to work collaboratively in an effective, supportive manner.”

All of the 2012 National Schools of Character serve as models and mentors, helping other educators transform their school cultures and improve academics and behavior. You can see details about each NSOC and the Promising Practices on CEP’s website. This year’s National Schools of Character represent 20 public schools, three private schools, one charter schooland one district.

The 297 Promising Practices will go to schools, districts, and organizations from across the United States, as well as from Brazil, Canada, Hong Kong, and Mexico. Winning practices were selected from a record-breaking 537 applications.See list of Promising Practice winners.

“These practices showcase so many creative and unique ways of dealing with challenges educators face each day,” said Lisa Greeves, manager of the Promising Practices program. “CEP is proud to recognize these educators and to give them an international platform upon which to share their hard work.”

This year’s winning practices include unique anti-bullying programs, successful integration of academics and character, self-motivation and goal-setting strategies, service-learning activities, and community outreach.

Both the National Schools of Character and Promising Practices will be featured at the National Forum on Character Education to take place Nov. 1-4, 2012, in Washington, DC, where they will share their secrets to success.

“These schools demonstrate school cultures that enable all their students to thrive socially and academically,” said NSOC Director Lara Maupin. “Schools of character are places that bring out the best in everyone – students, staff, and even parents and community members.” Watch a video about the power of Schools of Character.

To learn how your school can become a school of character, download CEP’s framework, the 11 Principles of Effective Character Education.

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Promising Practices Announced for 2012

May 14, 2012

Washington, DC – The Character Education Partnership (CEP) has announced it will award 297 Promising Practices to schools, districts, and organizations from across the United States, as well as from Brazil, Canada, Hong Kong, and Mexico. Winning practices were selected from a record-breaking 537 applications.

“These practices showcase so many creative and unique ways of dealing with challenges educators face each day,” said Lisa Greeves, manager of the Promising Practices program. “CEP is proud to recognize these educators and to give them an international platform upon which to share their hard work.”

This year’s winning practices include unique anti-bullying programs, successful integration of academics and character, self-motivation and goal-setting strategies, service-learning activities, and community outreach.

CEP’s 2012 National and International Promising Practices in Character Education represent:

  • 5 nations
  • 30 states and the District of Columbia – with the largest numbers from Missouri (107), New Jersey (31), New York (15), and Kansas (13)
  • 209 public schools, 18 charter schools, 15 private schools, 12 school districts, and 4 youth-serving organizations

CEP sponsors the annual program to showcase innovative best practices that are having an impact across the nation and abroad. CEP encourages educators with similar needs to learn from and even replicate these successful initiatives. CEP will honor the 2012 recipients at the 19th National Forum on Character Education, to be held in Washington, DC, November 1 – 3. Learn more by searching CEP’s database of Promising Practices.

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2012 National Schools of Character Selected

24 Schools and 1 School District Recognized for Excellence

May 14, 2012

CEP NSOC on Times Square

CEP’s salute to the 2012 National Schools of Character appeared in Times Square on May 18

Washington, DC– The Character Education Partnership (CEP) has named 20 public schools, 3 private schools, 1 charter school, and 1 school district as 2012 National Schools of Character (NSOC).

“These schools have built strong communities that bring people together around shared goals,” said Lara Maupin, NSOC Director. “Nobody feels alone or unwelcome in these schools. Adults are all on the same page about what’s important and, as a result, kids thrive.”

Each year, CEP selects schools and districts that demonstrate through a rigorous evaluation process that their focus on character development has had a positive impact on academic achievement, student behavior, and school climate. Selected schools are then expected to serve as models for other schools, helping them to achieve the same results.

CEP will honor the 2012 National Schools of Character at the National Forum on Character Education, to be held November 1  – 3 in Washington, DC.

For more information about National Schools of Character and how schools can improve through high-quality character education, watch the video Schools of Character: A Roadmap to Excellence

Character Education Partnership – 2012 National Schools of Character

NameLocation
Abraham Lincoln Elementary School
Rochester, New York
Berkeley Elementary School (PreK-2)Moncks Corner, South Carolina
Blessed Sacrament Catholic School (PreK-8)Sandy, Utah
Brentwood Middle School (6-8)Brentwood, Missouri
California Avenue School (K-5)Uniondale, New York
Cimino Elementary School (PreK-5)Valrico, Florida
Colegio Radians, Inc. (PreK-12)Cayey, Puerto Rico
Eagle Rock School and Professional Development Center (9-12)Estes Park, Colorado
Ellisville Elementary School (K-5)Ellisville, Missouri
Hamilton City School District (PreK-12)Hamilton, Ohio
Henry Raab Elementary School (K-6)Belleville, Illinois
Lake Bluff Elementary School (PreK-6)Shorewood, Wisconsin
Lawrenceville Elementary School (PreK-3)Lawrenceville, New Jersey
Lyles-Crouch Traditional Academy (K-5)Alexandria, Virginia
Mockingbird Elementary School (K-5)Coppell, Texas
Mountainville Academy (K-9)Alpine, Utah
North Boulevard School (PreK-5)Pompton Plains, New Jersey
Northview High School (9-12)Florissant, Missouri
Plattin Primary School (PreK-2)Festus, Missouri
Richard Stockton Elementary School (K-5)Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Ross Elementary School (K-5)St. Louis, Missouri
Russell Middle School of the Performing Arts and Sciences (6-8)Colorado Springs, Colorado
Shades Cahaba Elementary School (K-5)Homewood, Alabama
Trautwein Accelerated Elementary School (K-5)St. Louis, Missouri
Wilson Southern Middle School (6-8)West Lawn, Pennsylvania
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