Schools of Character Leadership Council

Schools of Character Leadership Council The Schools of Character Leadership Council ensures overall quality assurance of our Schools of Character and recommends processes to make Schools of Character sustainable. The council includes membership from the Education Advisory Council, coordinators, regional partners, staff and Character.org Board members. Phil Brown Phil Brown is a Consultant for the National School Climate Center. He has presented at numerous Character.org Forums and currently serves on Character.org’s Educational Advisory Committee. After serving in the NJ Department of Education, he created and directed the Center for Social and Character Development at Rutgers University that conducted research on evidence based prosocial programs. He established the NJ Alliance for Social, Emotional and Character Development that developed the State Schools of Character program for Character.org. Among his publications are the two volume, Handbook of Prosocial Education (2012) and School Discipline: A Prosocial Perspective (2016). Joseph Carvin Joe is the founder and CEO of One World United and Virtuous, an organization committed to improving human understanding and cooperation. The primary vehicle is One World Youth Clubs which are in six countries. The goal is creating a global learning network of leaders of character, knowledgeable of the world around them and capable of changing it for the better. Previously Joe worked in emerging market finance for 30 years with a focus on South America and recently completed 8 years as Town Supervisor of the Town of Rye, New York. Kent Fahrenbruck Kent …
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2018 Forum Exhibitors

2018 Forum Exhibitors Brixiples Table C Brixiples™ is a unique new board game designed to teach 7-12 year olds about Ethics, Safety, and Common Sense & Courtesy with 200 question cards. Through role playing, silly actions, and serious thought, 2-4 players and an adult guide discuss a broad swath of difficult and confusing topics. Contact: Jacqueline Dobranski Character.org Booth 7 Character.org focuses on defining and encouraging effective practices and approaches to quality character development and provides a forum for the exchange of ideas. We are a nonprofit organization that strives to ensure every person is educated, inspired and empowered to be ethical and compassionate citizens. Contact: Parker Pillsbury Choose To Be Nice Booth 17 Choose To Be Nice is dedicated to encouraging and inspiring kindness. We’re reminding people that we have a choice about how to “be” in the world. And it all starts with a promise. Make the promise today at www.choosetobenice.com. We implement kindness programs at schools and sell high quality merchandise including tees, tanks, sweatshirts, hats, bumper magnets, etc., all sporting the simple, positive and powerful Choose To Be Nice message. Contact: Dina Creiger Mascot Junction Booth 1 See how schools are using their mascot to teach character and positive behavior. Our Roll Out Kits are customized for each school, featuring their mascot in a variety of rules posters, matrix banners, award certificates, gotcha rewards, behavior clipart and other items designed to create a highly engaging mascot-centric school climate. …
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Character Awards

CALL FOR NOMINATIONS Character.org is now accepting nominations for the 2018 Character Award The Character Awards at the 2018 silver Anniversary Gala will recognize outstanding individuals who have worked hard to live a life of good character and serve as role models for others. These awards will bring together character leaders in education, sports, workplaces and communities as a whole. We will be celebrating prominent advocates from our past as well as today’s influential leaders.     X Past Recipients: 2017 Noah Galloway 2017 George Weiss 2016 Gov. Frank Keating 2015 Congressman John Lewis 2014 Justice Sandra Day O’Connor 2013 Richard Pieper 2012 Norman Augustine 2010 S. Truett Cathy 2009 General Colin Powell For more information, contact Iris Wyatt at iris@character.org.

Promising Practices Newsletter_April 2018

FEATURED PRACTICE Listening Circles A Promising Practice from Ladue Middle School in St. Louis, MO. Concerned that the rising level of intolerance and incivility in throughout the nation was having a negative effect on students at Ladue Middle School. Counselor Janey Worthington, joined by the administration, faculty and staff launched Listening Circles to create a constructive forum in which students could address how racism, intolerance and discord. “Listening circles were initiated to give students safe places to discuss differences of opinion and to restore a community that has always sought to celebrate – rather than denigrate – our diversity. Our circles begin with the establishment of norms – all voices will be heard in a respectful manner – and proceed with sharing thoughts and concerns about incidents of racism or incivility. While differences of political opinion are understood as part of the democratic process, the listening circle reinforces the importance of expressing those differences respectfully, and moving toward a sense of shared community.” The Listening circles are one way the Ladue Middle School community is working to reduce the tensions and mistrust that spread through much of region — Ladue is less than five miles from Ferguson. The great divisions of wealth and poverty throughout St. Louis are evident in the school’s corridors, As Janey explained in the Promising Practice narrative, “students at Ladue Middle School face daily one of the greatest challenges of our pluralistic, democratic society: how to …
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Promising Practices Newsletter_April 2018

Tracey Crouch may not be a household name in the United States, but her role as Britain’s first Minister of Loneliness embodies many of the aspirations we hold for our students’ character growth. Ms. Crouch was appointed to lead the work of a government-wide group with responsibility for developing policies that will reduce loneliness and promote inclusion in education, commerce, government and sports. Loneliness has grown into an epidemic in the United Kingdom; nearly 10 million people report always or often feeling lonely. And the problem is not limited to Great Britain; last year, the AARP surveyed Americans over the age of 45 and found that more than 42 million of the participants had experienced chronic loneliness and isolation. Unaddressed, this epidemic will continue to inflict harm on ever younger generations. As teachers and parents, we know that the root of adult isolation and fear of social engagement begins when children enter school, interact on the playground and participate in community-based sports and recreation activities. What often distinguishes the children and adolescents who are most often severely impacted by loneliness and isolation? Many are children already coping with social, emotional, cognitive and physical challenges. All of which brings me to one of my favorite topics: Promising Practices. If there is a common theme to the initiatives and instructional activities that are recognized as Promising Practices, it is that all of them place the student at the center. Whether it is …
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