Zero

Berkeley Elementary School

After reading the book Zero by Kathryn Otoshi (KO Kids Books, 2010), students will discuss what it means to be valued and fit in.

Students will represent/explain the value of zero in double digit numbers using the giant zero and number cards.
Students will write in their Math Journals to explain their understanding of the meaning of zero.
Students will respond in their Reading Response Journals to Zero’s feelings in the beginning or end of the story.
Students will pair/share ways to fill their partner’s bucket and make he/she feel they count.
Students will write "heartprints" to others to show how each member of our peaceful classroom community is valued.
Zero by Kathryn Otoshi
Journals
Place value mat
Base 10 blocks
Number cards
Large cut-out of the number 0
Dice/Number tiles
Paper
Scissors
Pens/Pencils/Crayons/Markers
The teacher will read the book Zero to her class.
Then the class will discuss the book.
Potential discussion questions:
How do you think Zero felt at the beginning and middle of the book? Why did she feel that way? How do you think she felt at the end of the book? Why did she feel that way?
-What does it mean to feel valued?
-What did Zero mean when she said “I’ll never have value. I’ll never be part of the count.”?
-What does the number zero mean?
-What does the phrase in the book, “bringing more value to everyone” mean?
-What happens to a number when you add zeros?

After the class discussion, the teacher will model the words “place holder” by using a group of students and the giant zero
-Students will represent/explain the value of zero in double digit numbers using the giant zero and number cards.
-Decompose numbers using the giant Place Value mat and Base Ten blocks. Students will roll dice to generate number, then build number in tens and ones on mat. (differentiated to include 100s)
-Students will work cooperatively with individual Place Value mats and Base Ten blocks to build their number as we use the giant mat and blocks.
- Students will cooperatively count the heartprints in our class bucket that was filled this week by placing them on the giant Place Ten mat. Students will demonstrate ten single hearts in the Ones place, group the ten in a Ziploc bag and move to Tens place, continuing until the hearts have been counted.
-Students will use dice/number tiles to represent >, +, < when comparing double digit numbers

Then, students will write in their Math Journals to explain their understanding of the meaning of zero.
-After building numbers using the Place Value mats and Base Ten Blocks, students will show their work in their Math Journals explaining their process with words.
-Students use their Math Journals to record the process of counting our heartprints.
-Students will record their number comparisons on slates or in Math Journals
-Students will respond in their Reading Response Journals to Zero’s feelings in the beginning or end of the story.

Finally, students will pair/share ways to fill their partner’s bucket and make he/she feel they count
-Students will write heartprints to others to show how each member of our peaceful classroom community is valued.
Formal:
-rubric for math journal writing prompt
-rubric for oral story retelling

Informal:
-teacher observation of student number building
-teacher observation of students demonstrating cooperation/compromise
-Generate a “text to text” connection between the book Zero and the book One.
-Orally retell story in sequential order.
-Discuss the author’s craft of using numbers as the characters.
-What was the problem in the story? How was it solved?
National Standards
Math Standards/Skills
1.NBT-2 Understand that the two digits of a two-digit number represent amounts of tens and ones.
1.NBT-2a 10 can be thought of as a bundle of ten ones-called a “ten”
1.NBT-2b The numbers from 11 to 19 are composed of a ten and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.
1.NBT-2c The numbers 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 refer to one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine tens (and 0 ones).
1.NBT-3 Compare two two-digit numbers based on meanings of the tens and ones digits, recording the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, <.
2.NBT-1 Understand that the three digits of a three-digit number represent amounts of hundreds, tens, and ones.
2.NBT-1a 100 can be thought of as a bundle of ten tens-called a “hundred”.
2.NBT-1b The numbers 100,200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, 900, refer to one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine hundreds
2. NBT-4 Compare two three-digit numbers based on meanings of the hundreds, tens, and ones digits, using >, =, < symbols to record the results of comparisons.

Writing Standards/Skills
1-4.1 Generate ideas for writing by using techniques (for ex, participating in conversations and looking at pictures).
1-4.2 Use simple sentences in writing.
2-5.1 Create written communication to inform a specific audience

Reading Standards/Skills
1-1.1 Summarize the main idea and supporting evidence in literary text during classroom discussion.
1-1.5 Generate a retelling that identifies the characters and the setting in a story and relates the important events in sequential order.
1-1.6, 2-2.6 Explain how elements of author’s craft affect the meaning of a given literary text.
1-1.8 create responses to literary texts through a variety of methods (for example, writing, creative dramatics, and the visual and performing arts).
1-1.9 Classify a text as either fiction or nonfiction
1.3-2 Identify base words and their inflectional endings
1-3.20 Use pictures and words to construct meaning.
1-3.22 Know the parts of a book
2-1.5 Analyze a narrative text to identify char., setting and plot
2-3.2 Construct meaning through a knowledge of base words, prefixes & suffixes

Social Studies Standards/Skills
1-6.3 Identify ways that families and communities cooperate and compromise in order to meet their needs and wants.

Other Suggested Reading
One by Kathryn Otoshi (KO Kids Books, 2008)
A Place for Zero: A Math Adventure by Angeline Sparagna Lopresti and Phyllis Hornung (Charlesbridge Publishing, 2003)
Earth Day -- Hooray! by Stuart J. Murphy (HarperCollins; 1 edition, 2004)
One Hundred Hungry Ants by Elinor J. Pinczes (Sandpiper, 1999)
From One to One Hundred by Teri Sloat (Puffin, 1995)
Unique Monique by Maria Rousaki and Polina Papanikolaou (Kane/Miller Book Publishers, 2008)
Spaghetti in a Hot Dog Bun: Having the Courage to Be Who You Are by Maria Dismondy (Making Spirits Bright: One Book At A Time; Reprint edition, 2008)
Howard B. Wigglebottom Listens to His Heart by Howard Binkow (Lerner Publishing Group; 1st edition, 2008)
The Cheerios Counting Book by Barbara Barbieri McGrath (Cartwheel Books [Scholastics],1998)
Can You Count to a Googol? by Robert E. Wells (Albert Whitman & Company, 2000)
Judy Rainey and Stephanie Wallace, Berkeley Elementary School